View on GitHub

Highpointers-Konvention-2022

Home - Registration - Schedule - Nearby Attractions

Nearby Attractions

Highpoints

These links are for the trailheads and parking:

Mount Davis

        Rock at Mt Davis

Backbone Mountain

        Sign at Backbone Mountain

Spruce Knob

        Tower at Spruce Knob


Airports

Airport Distance Code
Pittsburgh International Airport 78 miles PIT
Arnold Palmer Latrobe Airport 25 miles LBE
Allegheny County Airport 51 miles AGC
Somerset County Airport 20 miles 2G9
John Murtha Johnstown Airport 45 miles JST
Morgantown Municipal Airport 57 miles MGW
Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport 26 miles VVS

Taxis and ride sharing are common in Pittsburgh - Uber, Lyft, ZTrip, etc. However Laurel Highlands is far enough away from Pittsburgh you should consider a rental car if you choose to fly.


Train Stations

The Amtrak route Capitol Limited does two trips a day. It is ideal for those who want less driving and more relaxing.

Train Station Distance Address
Connellsville 21 miles North Water Street &, W Peach St, Connellsville, PA 15425
Pittsburgh 61 miles 1100 Liberty Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
Cumberland 49 miles 201 E Harrison St, Cumberland, MD 21502

Hospitals

Health icon

Close to Hospital Address
Venue UPMC Somerset 225 South Center Avenue, Somerset, PA 15501
Venue Highlands Hospital 401 E Murphy Ave, Connellsville, PA 15425
Venue Excela Health Westmorland Hospital 532 W Pittsburgh St, Greensburg, PA 15601
Venue AHN Hempfield Neighborhood Hospital 6321 US-30, Greensburg, PA 15601
Mount Davis Conemaugh Meyersdale Medical Center 200 Hospital Drive, Meyersdale, PA 15552
Backbone Mountain Garrett Regional Medical Center 251 N 4th St, Oakland, MD 21550
Spruce Knob Davis Medical Center 812 Gorman Ave, Elkins, WV 26241



RV campgrounds

RV icon

Kooser State Park

Laurel Hill State Park

Lost Mountain Campground

Pioneer Park Campground

Posey Corners Campground

Scottyland Camping Resort

Tent campgrounds

Tent icon

Kooser State Park

Laurel Hill State Park

Lost Mountain Campground

Posey Corners Campground

Scottyland Camping Resort Scottyland also has a cabin.


Laural Highlands

Tent icon

There is much to see in the Laurel Highlands region. This list can help you start planning your exploration. The list is not exhaustive nor in any specific order. Please also visit LaurelHighlands.org for more information and ideas for daytrips.

Laurel Highlands Hiking Trail

70 miles long. Rugged and steep in some places. Great for dayhiking and also supports multiple day hikes. Overnight trail shelters require reservation in advance. More details and high-resolution trail map can be found on the PA Dept of Conservation and Natural Resources website. Expect to see some mountain laurel blooming in June. GoLauralHighlands.com says the Route 30 trailhead outside of Ligonier is a good location to see it.

Hemlock Trail Natural Area

Hike 1.2 miles through Old Growth forest in the Laurel Hill State Park. More information on the Old-Growth Forest Network website, which has a map for finding other old growth forests. placeholder

Greater Allegheny Passage Biking Trail

Departing from Mount Davis by car, the nearest parking lot access to the GAP Trail would be at Fort Hill. The Pinkerton Tunnel, which is recently renovated, is 2.5 miles east from the Fort Hill parking lot (135 Sechler Rd, Fort Hill, PA 15540) at mile 54.3 of the trail. Confluence is in the western direction from the Fort Hill parking lot. Confluence at mile marker 61.6.

Confluence, PA

Bike rentals are available at the Confluence Cyclery. Confluence has a visitor website with ideas for recreation and exploring.

Salisbury Viaduct

The Salisbury Viaduct is a long bridge on the Greater Allegheny Passage that crosses over US Highway 219, CSX railroad tracks, and the Casselman River Valley. Hike or Bike across it. There are benches at both ends of the viaduct. The view is beautiful view. The maximum height is 101 feet above the ground. It is an excellent place to watch sunrises and sunsets. Historical placards tell the history of the bridge and have pictures of it being constructed. Train traffic on the Salisbury Viaduct stopped in 1975.

Salsbury Viaduct

Kooser State Park

Originally land of the United Lumber Company, Pennsylvania bought the land when the company went bankrupt. The park and public camp was started in 1925 and was popular with motorists. Today the park has both rustic and modern cabins for reservation as well as RV sites.

Kooser State Park

Flight 93 Memorial

Flight 93 was one of the flights hijacked during the September 11, 2001 attacks. It crashed after an attempt by passengers and crew to regain control of the plane from the hijackers. The National Park Service created a national memorial and visitors center. Here you will find an emotionally moving tribute to those who died that day. There is a wall with the passenger names, a wall around the debris field outline, recordings of phone calls sent before the crash, and The Tower of Voices, which is a 93 foot tall tower with carefully engineered wind chimes. Budget about two to three hours for your visit. Free admission.

Flight 93 National Memorial

Guild of American Papercutters Art Museum

This is the first American museum devoted to the art of papercutting. The museum has a permanent collection of papercuts and annual themed special exhibitions. There are some pictures on the guild’s website of the works in their collection and members’ works too.

Philip Dressler Center

Fallingwater

Fallingwater is a legendary house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright for the Kaufmann family. Tour reservations must be made in advance.

Fallingwater

Funicular Railways

Funiculars are train-like vehicles pulled by cables up and down a steep hill, counter-balanced by the weight of the other car.

Johnstown Flood

The Johnstown Flood Museum and the Johnstown Flood National Memorial explains and memorializes the great tragedy of 1889.

Fort Necessity National Battlefield

See the battlefield where the British regulars and colonial forces under the command of George Washington fought and honorably surrendered to the French and Indians in 1754. The fort has been reconstructed with white oak, as found by archeologic studying of the site. There is a handicapped accessible walking path from the parking lot to the fort. The park is one mile away from the grave of General Edward Braddock, who was commander-in-chief of the British Army at the start of the French and Indian war. Watch this introductory video from National Park Service to learn more.